Craigslist Junkie

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CL Repost: Miniature Horse–Would you buy this horse? It looks CRAZY! July 8, 2010

Miniature Horse – $400 (Rogersville, MO) 

Date: 2010-07-08, 9:06PM CDT 

Reply to: sale-t2vfs-1833082123@craigslist.org [Errors when replying to ads?] 

Wonderful, smart and easy going miniature horse for sale. He learns quickly and has a fantastic personality, just needs a job. I don’t have the time for him and he is being wasted. He would make an EXCELLENT TRICK PONY, cart horse or riding horse! I have him as a pet and companion horse which he would also be helpful as. He has been trained in Parelli natural horsemanship and has learned the first seven games. Trailers, started clipping and bathing. email/call for more information. Good home only. 

image 1833082123-0 

417-766-3544 

Lo#ation: Rogersville, MO 

it’s NOT ok to contact this poster with services or other commercial interests 

via Miniature Horse.

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Another Water Garden June 5, 2010

My original water garden was supposed to be created out of a stock tank. I came across a stock tank at Nixa Hardware that was surrounded with landscaping rocks and wanted to recreate it in my yard. I came across a stock tank on Craigslist for a mere $20.00. It had a couple of holes that we plugged with Great Stuff and it was as good as new!!

Using a free pool pump, I worked out a filtration system and a fountain, again, all free off Craigslist.

We never could get the rocks to work right, so instead, I just set it up and did some other things to make it attractive. I found a neat idea while geeking one day to use some bamboo around the edge.

I have an out of commission bamboo shade that I bought from Lowes. I measured it out and put it around the outside edge. We filled it full of water lilies and other plants we got off Craigslist. I put some Japanese Irises around the front and a wooden plank that was part of the landscaping when I bought the house.

We spent a whopping $50.00 total on this project between the stock tank, Great Stuff, and plants!

 

Fire Pit June 4, 2010

Since the water garden with the landscaping rocks didn’t work out, we made a firepit out of the remaining landscaping rocks instead. We did use the stock tank as a guide, because originally, it was going to go in there, so it is circular and 6′ wide. We bought bags of morter and sand to concrete all the stones together. Pretty simple project once we decided it wasn’t going to be a water garden!!

 

Just wanted to share a website June 3, 2010

I really like this website. There are a lot of excellent DIY information on here about building water gardens and boulders, paths, filters, stepping stones, etc. Great instruction, lots of details, and pretty inexpensive projects.

Tadege Koi and Water Garden

 

Nut cheese May 29, 2010

 

Nut cheese (springfield )


Date: 2010-05-29, 9:38AM CDT
Reply to: sale-madsw-1765327953@craigslist.org [Errors when replying to ads?]


I have about 3 pounds of good nut cheese that i just dont need so if you are interested give a me a call
4176934185

Nut cheese

Nice posting huh? LMAO

 

The Fire Pit

Another project from all those wonderful landscaping stones…

This project started out as a watergarden. I found a beautiful watergarden at Nixa Hardware and wanted the same for my home. It was a stock tank, flanked inside and outside with these landscaping stones, bottom of it was gravel.

I aquired a stock tank from craigslist for $20.00, 6′ diameter, 2.5′ deep–according to the previous owners, it may have a couple of pinholes in it. Well, not all craigslist deals are good deals–this one was a bad one. The stock tank was riddled with all sizes of holes in it! So, the watergarden became a fire pit.

Basically, we just used the stock tank as a guide, set the stones around it in a circular fashion to keep it nice and round. My husband bought concrete and sand and we mixed it up and set all the stones, inside and out, and let dry.

Wal-lah! Free fire pit! 🙂

Once we gave up the idea of this project holding water, it became a very simple one and about a $50.00 investment in concrete and sand.

  

 

Chicken Fence! May 21, 2010

I really enjoyed having free-range chickens. I really did not enjoy the poop on my back deck and patio table. So, a fence became a necessity if I was going to keep chickens 🙂

This project ended up costing a bit more than I wanted, but not because I didn’t have the materials. It’s because the husband wanted to build it a different way. I did have free t-post (thank you Deanna) and free fencing (thank you CL guy).

I found the most amazing deal on fencing. There was a guy who advertised 2×4 field fencing for free on CL. Basically, it was wrapped 2 high around a tennis court and he wanted the court gone. All we had to do was remove the fencing. We ended up with over 700 feet of 5′ tall field fencing for free. We only used a fraction of it for this project and we didn’t use the t-posts, so I’m thinking goats for another project 🙂

This project started with a trip to Lowes for pressure treated 2×4’s and 4×4’s, bags of concrete, screws, gate hardware, and plastic square netting. We also picked up my husband’s brother while we were out because of all the holes that needed dug (thank you Josh!).

Brush was cleared, rocks were raked (love Missouri rocks), holes were dug, 4×4’s were set, 2x4s were added to frame in the area.

Here’s what it looked like after day 1:

And after Day 2 (sorry about the blurry pic, I didn’t realize it was terrible until it was too late to take another): 

After everything was framed in, the fencing was added using fencing staples. Oh, and the hubby built a lovely gate and a tin roof (tin roof was free courtesy of an old barn from CL) over part of the run for cover. I used a staple gun and zip ties to put the plastic fencing over the top of the whole run, making it flight proof! And I almost forgot, the plants in front of the coop were free from CL too! It’s called liarope, it spreads well, so it should fill in the front of the coop well. It’s a hardy perinnial with purple flowers. A lady decided she wanted to change landscaping, so they became mine!

I’m happy and the chickens are happy. Now, regarding money–we saved over $300 in fencing costs, but still spent a little more than $200 in the wood, concrete, and hardware. If we had used the t-posts, all we would have bought that I know of are clips to attach the fence to the t-posts. Overall, a darn good find on the fencing, especially since we can continue to use it for more animals and things.